Letter of Good Standing (LoGS)

Letter of Good Standing (LoGS) Overview The Compensation Fund’s Letter of Good Standing (LoGS) can be viewed just as important as the South African Revenue Service’s (SARS) Tax Clearance Certificates. Letters of Good Standing are especially important for: • Tenders • Government business contracts and renewals, and • Contractor work Legally, mandators, or employers, can be held liable for claims as well as assessment costs of their contractors if they are either not registered with the Compensation Fund, or if they are not up to date with their fees payable annually.

A Step-by-step guide to getting a Letter of Good Standing so that you are health and safety compliant

A Step-by-step guide to getting a Letter of Good Standing so that you are health and safety compliant Overview Before providing a step-by-step guide to getting a Letter of Good Standing so that you are health and safety compliant, it is first necessary to understand what it is, why it is required, and what the workman’s compensation is. What is a Letter of Good Standing and why is it required? A Letter of Good Standing is an official document which proves that an employer has the backing of the Workman’s Compensation Fund (COID) in assisting with payment of work-related injuries or harm to employees, as payments to the Fund are up to date. The Letter of Good Standing is important as it serves as a form of security that the employer can be assured that they will not be responsible for paying medical bills or any other compensation to employees in case of a work-related injury or illness. Employers who do not have a Letter of Good Standing either did not register with the Compensation Commissioner or they owe the Workman’s Compensation Fund money. It subsequently means that employees are not covered by COID and that clients are not safeguarded if a work-related accident occurs on their premises.

Posted date: 13th Mar 2021
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Contractor and or Suppliers health and safety risks

Contractor and/or Suppliers' health and safety risks Overview Despite the size of an organisation, at some point, employers may have to use a contractor for a task. There are some employers who make use of contractors on a regular basis, while others use them daily, for various tasks such as maintenance. Despite the frequency with which contractors are used, many employers may be concerned with the best ways to balance two desirable goals: Running continuous safe operations, and Avoid becoming liable for negligence of contractors hired. It is therefore imperative to outline and explore contractor and/or suppliers’ health and safety risks that they may pose on operations. The general rule is that the employer does not owe a duty to ensure that the independent contractor appointed performs their work in a safe manner. However, should an employer exert too much control over the details of how the contractor must perform their work, they can be held liable for the acts or the omissions of that specific contractor. Employers recognise, in addition to the duty that they have towards their direct employees, invitees, and even the public outside the premises,

Posted date: 13th Mar 2021
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Health and Safety for Contractors and Suppliers, who is Responsible? You or them?

Health and Safety for Contractors and Suppliers, who is Responsible? You or them? Overview It is common for organisations, clients, or employers, to make use of contractors to help them perform essential activities as well as skill-specific tasks. However, an important consideration with regards to health and safety for contractors and suppliers, is who is responsible? You, or them? The business owner, or client, may already have a reasonable handle on the health and safety responsibilities where their own employees are concerned. However, a lot of employers may not be sure where contractors fit into the picture. When engaging with contractors who are not familiar with the safety procedures of the employer, there may be a substantial number of risks, which could lead to the employer in failing their responsibility as a business owner. This is something that employers cannot afford, neither can they afford to be ignorant regarding the duties that they owe their contractors. It is therefore vital to understand who is responsible for contractor safety when they are on the premises of the employer. Contractors may not possess a full understanding or knowledge of the employer’s safety management systems. They may also not be trained or overseen in the same manner as the direct employees of the employer. This results in contractors posing a considerable risk to safety on site. Not only will the appointed contractor be exposed to risks which exist on the employer’s premises, there is potential that they may introduce new risks, which may pose a threat to employees. Employers are legally obliged to produce a healthy and safe working environment, where there is no danger to the health, safety, or wellbeing of employees, but how can employers manage risks introduced by their contractors?

Posted date: 13th Mar 2021
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What every contractor and/or supplier in South Africa must know about health and safety – Part 1

What every contractor and/or supplier in South Africa must know about health and safety – Part 1 Overview There are numerous guides which elaborate on what every contractor and/or supplier in South Africa must know about health and safety. The reason for this concerns the importance surrounding an employer’s duty towards providing a safe and healthy working environment. The following few sections will provide employers with all that they need to know as there is no substitute for the Occupational Health and Safety Act in South Africa, and thus, compliance is mandatory. The Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1993, requires that employers bring about and maintain, as far as reasonably practicable, a work environment which is both safe and without risk to the health of employees. This means that all employers must ensure that the workplace is free of hazardous substances including, but not limited to:

Posted date: 13th Mar 2021
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Employer's health and safety responsibilities in South Africa towards suppliers contractors and visitors

Employer's health and safety responsibilities in South Africa towards suppliers, contractors, and visitors Overview What is the employer’s health and safety responsibilities in South Africa towards suppliers, contractors, and visitors? Employers, as according to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, 85 of 1993, have a duty towards ensuring that employees and any visitors to the premises are safeguarded against hazards and risks. In addition to these duties, there are regulations which deal with hazards for industries that feature high risks. Health and Safety Regulations The Occupational Health and Safety Act (85 of 1993) is the primary legislation which covers work-related health and safety in South Africa. It clearly sets out

Posted date: 13th Mar 2021
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Ensuring that suppliers will not be a health and safety risk on your premises in South Africa

Ensuring that suppliers will not be a health and safety risk on your premises in South Africa Overview Employees are the most important asset of any organisation and for this reason, their health and safety are crucial. However, as much as an organisation may rely on its own employees, there is also reliance on contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers. It is therefore imperative for organisations to ensure that suppliers will not be a health and safety risk on your premises in South Africa, and that they consider management systems, especially health and safety risks, as this has a substantial impact on service delivery to the organisation. Another consideration involves the services that the staff of suppliers provide when they visit the organisation’s premises, whether they know what they should be doing on site, and whether they adhere to health and safety rules applied to the organisation’s own employees. There are various levels of protection put in place, and maintained, to prevent health and safety risks to the organisation as well as employees, specifically pertaining to government law and legislation, by ensuring Best Practice recommendations to ensure that the necessary steps are taken.

Posted date: 13th Mar 2021
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